Apr 23

By JQ magazine editor Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobeshi, 2001-02) for Examiner.com. Visit his Japanese culture page here for related stories.

As spring continues and the weather continues to warm, New Yorkers can enjoy activities all over the city both indoors and out.

This month’s highlights include:

Courtesy of Bam.org

Monday, May 1, 7:30 p.m.

An Evening with George Takei

BAM Howard Gilman Opera House, 30 Lafayette Avenue

$35-$75

Actor and social justice activist George Takei brings his uncanny eloquence and signature wit to BAM. In this very special evening, he shares the story of his Japanese-American family’s forced internment during World War II, a seemingly forgotten part of American history. He also takes audiences through his rise to celebrity as a sci-fi icon, his remarkable journey as social media mega power, and his passionate fight for LGBTQ rights and marriage equality in America—empowering others to beat the odds and make a difference.

Courtesy of Static1.squarespace.com

Thursday, May 4, 9:00 p.m.

Kikagaku Moyo

Rough Trade NYC, 64 North 9th Street (Brooklyn)

$15

Kikagaku Moyo (Geometric Patterns) is the musical union between five free spirits. Go Kurosawa (drums, Vocals) and Tomo Katsurada (Guitar, Vocals) formed the band in 2012 as a free artist’s collective. They met Kotsuguy (Bass) while he was recording noise from vending machines and Akira (Guitar) through their university. Ryu Kurosawa had been studying Sitar in India, upon returning home he found the perfect outlet for his practice. Since 2013 the band has released two full lengths, an EP, and several singles. They have toured Australia, the United States, Europe and Japan extensively. Their music is a conversation—sometimes delicate and tender other times explosive, but always human and always changing. With support from Mountain Movers and Jason SpacinKillinger.

Courtesy of Bbkingblues.com

Thursday, May 11, 7:30 p.m.

Ritchie Kotzen

B.B. King Blues Club & Grill, 237 West 42nd Street

$29.50-$69.50

With guitar styles ranging from rock, blues, jazz and fusion to pop and soul, Richie Kotzen has built a remarkably diverse 25-plus year career as a guitarist, singer and songwriter. A veteran of numerous groups including the Winery Dogs, Kotzen’s Japan cred is extensive: He wrote the number one song “Shine” as a member of Mr. Big, which was used as the ending theme for the anime series Hellsing, has recorded an entire album of music from the anime series Gundam, and toured as the opening act on the Japanese leg of the Rolling Stones’ 2006 tour. The Kotzen Telecaster guitar has repeatedly been the #1 selling signature model guitar for Fender Japan. This show will include selections from his new album, Salting Earth. Read More


Apr 15

Click image to read article

By JQ magazine editor Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobe-shi, 2001-02) for Shukan NY Seikatsu. Justin has written about Japanese arts and entertainment for JETAA since 2005. For more of his articles, click here.

What do you get when you take candy-coated J-pop idol fashion, frenetic European folk accordion melodies, and a stuffed pink pig—all happening on the same stage?

You get Charan-Po-Rantan, the “alternative chanson” duo of sisters Momo (vocals) and Koharu (accordion). Their music is an eclectic, multi-ethnic mix that combines originals from Koharu with inspired cover tunes ranging from Puffy to “Hava Nagilah” to the Super Mario Brothers theme, creating an infectious live experience.

Originally formed in 2009 and signed as Avex recording artists in 2014, Charan-Po-Rantan’s latest album was released in January. This popular live act has made a high-profile splash everywhere from Nippon Budokan to SXSW, and now the group has returned to New York for their first local gigs since 2015. Momo and Koharu kick things off by headlining Joe’s Pub on April 24, followed by an encore performance at Japan Society as part of the Godzilla Legend: Music of Akira Ifukube showcase with techno-pop band Hikashu on April 28.

In a statement about the upcoming shows, the group said, “We are so happy to be going back to our favorite place—New York! We heard that New York is called a salad bowl of different cultures, and our music is sometimes called ‘a melting pot of world music.’ Please come taste our Tokyo sound, which mixes different genres and eras.”

For more information and tickets, follow the group on Facebook at /charanporantan.


Apr 8

JQ Magazine: Nippon in New York — ‘Your Name,’ Miyavi, Charan-Po-Rantan

By JQ magazine editor Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobeshi, 2001-02) for Examiner.com. Visit his Japanese culture page here for related stories.

Spring has sprung in the Big Apple, and that means one thing: a new season of sounds, colors, and spectacular performing arts to match the blossoming sakura trees throughout the city.

This month’s highlights include:

© 2016 “YOUR NAME.” FILM PARTNERS

Now playing

Your Name

Various locations, subtitled and dubbed

$14-$16.29

Written and directed by Makoto Shinkai (Centimeters Per Second, Children Who Chase Lost Voices), the highest-grossing internationally released anime film in history finally comes to America! The day the stars fell, two lives changed forever. High schoolers Mitsuha and Taki are complete strangers living separate lives. But one night, they suddenly switch places. Mitsuha wakes up in Taki’s body, and he in hers. This bizarre occurrence continues to happen randomly, and the two must adjust their lives around each other. Yet, somehow, it works. They build a connection and communicate by leaving notes, messages, and more importantly, an imprint. When a dazzling comet lights up the night’s sky, something shifts, and they seek each other out wanting something more—a chance to finally meet.

Courtesy of Bbkingblues.com

Sunday, April 9, 8:00 p.m.

Keiko Matsui

B.B. King Blues Club and Grill, 237 West 42nd Street

$29.50 advance, $35 day of show

A courageous, spiritually-driven and consummate artist who transcends boundaries, Keiko Matsui has worked alongside the best, including Miles Davis, Stevie Wonder, Hugh Masakela, and Bob James. Her unique melting pot of musical influences have garnered her a devout international following, as she tours relentlessly and seeks to make a genuine connection with her audience. “This music energizes me and I am overwhelmed with emotion when I listen to it. I hope people will allow themselves to go inside the music and become a part of my journey,” says the Tokyo native. In the words of Duke Ellington, Keiko Matsui is “beyond category.”

Courtesy of Clubbonafide.com

Friday, April 21, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

Orange Pekoe

Club Bonafide, 212 East 52nd Street

$20

Orange Pekoe is a band composed of vocalist Tomoko Nagashima and guitarist Kazuma Fujimoto. Formed in 1998, they started creating original songs and have developed a unique sound sublimating various types of music such as jazz, Latin, Brazilian and soul. Since then, Orange Pekoe has been acclaimed as a one-of-a-kind uniquely artistic band.. Their performance style varies from a duo to a band, sometimes playing alongside a 16-member big band-style orchestra, which they received renown as one of the most unique and talented artists in Japan.

Read More


Mar 1

Event: TOMODACHI-Mitsui & Co. Leadership Program

Posted by Sydney Sparrow, an ALT currently living in Toyota CityClick here to join the JETwit Jobs Google Group and receive job listings even sooner by email.


Here’s an exchange opportunity via JETAADC:

The U.S.-Japan Council/TOMODACHI Initiative is pleased to announce the fifth year of the TOMODACHI-Mitsui & Co. Leadership Program, a unique bicultural exchange program designed to motivate a new generation of leaders and creative thinkers who are interested in the future of U.S.-Japan relations.  We are seeking qualified professionals from across America and Japan who are active in the public and private sectors.

Attached is a letter from Irene Hirano Inouye, President – U.S.-Japan Council, along with detailed information about this program.  We would greatly appreciate your support in circulating the attached program announcement and encouraging qualified individuals to apply for this exciting opportunity.
  
Should you have any questions, please email Noriko Litwin at nlitwin@wls2.com or Wes Stockstill at wstockstill@wls2.com

 http://usjapantomodachi.org/2017/02/21323/

Thank you and warm regards,

The TOMODACHI Initiative


Feb 23

Justin’s Japan: ‘Your Name’ Premieres at NYICFF

Click image to read article

Click image to read article

By JQ magazine editor Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobe-shi, 2001-02) for Shukan NY Seikatsu. Justin has written about Japanese arts and entertainment for JETAA since 2005. For more of his articles, click here.

Now celebrating its 20th year, the New York International Children’s Film Festival returns this month, continuing its mission to cultivate an appreciation for the arts for moviegoers of all ages.

Anime films are a staple of NYICFF, and this year’s citywide selections are “Rudolf the Black Cat” (Feb. 25, March 4-5, 19), a modern-day CGI-animated tale of two kitties that celebrates the wonder of discovery; “Panda! Go Panda!” (Feb. 26, March 5, 11, 18), a retro classic from 1972 directed by Isao Takahata and featuring original concepts and character designs by Hayao Miyazaki; and “Ancien and the Magic Tablet” (March 18-19), a fender- and genre-bending film set in the not-too-distant future whose second screening also hosts director Kenji Kamiyama as part of the closing ceremonies.

By far, the most anticipated film is the East Coast premiere of “Your Name” (Feb. 25). Released in Japan last August, it smashed all box office records for the year and is currently the highest-grossing anime film worldwide (beating out Miyazaki’s own Oscar-winning “Spirited Away” by over $40 million at press time).

Written and directed by Makoto Shinkai (“5 Centimeters per Second”), “Your Name” tells the story of a young man living in Tokyo and a young woman living in the countryside who suddenly start switching bodies on a regular basis. It has been widely praised for both its animation style and emotional impact.

For more on this year’s festival, visit http://nyicff.org. Tickets are available at www.ticketweb.com.

 


Feb 22

Career Fair: U.S. Positions Using Japanese at Over 30 Companies (New York, NY, USA)

Posted by Sydney Sparrow, an ALT currently living in Toyota CityClick here to join the JETwit Jobs Google Group and receive job listings even sooner by email.


Event: Career Fair – U.S. Positions Using Japanese at Over 30 Companies
Location: New York, NY, USA
Date: March 25, 2017

Thanks to  Katie Yokota from DISCO International, Inc (which organizes job fairs for Japanese-English bilinguals) for the following career fair taking place next month:

JET alumni with at least conversational Japanese language ability are invited to the U.S. Career Forum 2017 on March 25. Companies will be holding information sessions, accepting resumes, and conducting interviews during the one-day event.

—– U.S. Career Forum 2017 —–

March 25 (Sat.), 10:00am – 6:00pm

Javits Center, Hall 1E

655 W 34th Street, New York, NY 10001

http://www.careerforum.net/event/us/?ref=2017JETwit&lang=E

Register and begin applying to companies here: http://www.careerforum.net/event/us/comlist.asp?ref=2017JETwit&lang=E

*There is no cost to register for or attend Career Forums.

*No cancellation is required if you later become unable to attend.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Katie Yokota, at katie@discointer.com.

We hope to see you in New York!


Feb 6

WIT Life #310: The Beauty of Washi

WIT Life is a periodic series written by professional Writer/Interpreter/Translator Stacy Smith (Kumamoto-ken CIR, 2000-03). She starts her day by watching Fujisankei’s newscast in Japanese, and here she shares some of the interesting tidbits and trends along with her own observations.

20170204_160148

One of Suzuki Sensei’s amazing works: 以花為師 (“Life lessons from flowers”). It reads from right to left, but is slightly cut off at start.

This weekend I had a chance to sit in on a culture class at the Nippon Club for the purpose of writing an article in Chopsticks.  We were studying calligraphy, but specifically practicing this art on 和紙 (washi or Japanese paper).  Sensei Mori Suzuki was visiting from Japan just for this class, and in addition to guest teaching we got to enjoy an exhibition of his work and other washi delights in the 7th floor gallery.  Entitled 「和紙・伝統と創造」 (Washi: Dentou and Souzou or “Washi Paper: Cultural Heritage and Artistic Creativity”), this exhibit introduces the history of traditional handmade washi, the aesthetic beauty of 切金(kirikane or metallic foil cut into strips or other shapes to form decorative motifs) through the subtle light reflected from foil, origami artwork, modern washi sculptures, and Suzuki Sensei’s calligraphy creations on handmade washi. It runs through February 24 with free admission, and the gallery is open every day but Sunday so make sure to check it out before it closes!

 


Feb 5

JQ Magazine: Nippon in New York — ‘Your Name’ Premiere, Hougaku Quartet, ‘Girl X’

 

By JQ magazine editor Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobe-shi, 2001-02). Justin has written about Japanese arts and entertainment for JETAA since 2005. For more of his articles, click here.

Stay warm this winter with some hot local events, from an exhibition that will transport you to another time and place, some new an classic anime screenings, and a mash-up multimedia performance you won’t want to miss.

This month’s highlights include:

Courtesy of Cmom.org

Courtesy of Cmom.org

Now through May 14

Hello from Japan!

Children’s Museum of Manhattan, 212 West 83rd Street

$12 children and adults, $8 seniors 

Back for the new year, this exhibit highlights how old and new traditions coexist in Japan, giving visitors a family-friendly window into Japanese culture. Children will have fun learning about life in present day Japan in this playful, immersive environment. Hello from Japan! is a new interactive exhibit in the Museum’s Lower Level Gallery. It will transport families to two distinct areas of Tokyo that exist side by side: the serene and exquisite Shinto Shrine Park, and the too-cute-for-words Kawaii Central.

Courtesy of Citycinemas.com

Courtesy of Citycinemas.com

Feb 7-8

The Ghost in the Shell

City Cinemas Village East Cinema, 181-189 Second Avenue

$15 

Before the release of next month’s live-action adaptation starring Scarlett Johansson and Takeshi Kitano, catch one of the greatest anime films of all time (based on the manga by Masamune Shirow and directed by Mamoru Oshii) on the big screen! In the near future, an elite group of police cyborgs called Section 9 works to stop hackers from commiting cyber crimes across the globe. However, there skills are put to the test when they come up against a hacker known as the Puppet Master. The pair of Feb. 7 screenings will be in Japanese with English subtitles; Feb. 8’s screening is English dubbed.

Courtesy of Asiasociety.org

Courtesy of Asiasociety.org

Thursday, Feb. 16, 8:00 p.m.

The Hougaku Quartet

Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue

Free, tickets available here.

Re-envisioning Japanese traditional instruments for contemporary music, the Hougaku Quartet explores everything from traditional Japanese music to cutting edge new compositions, all performed on traditional instruments. The quartet is made up of a group of young virtuoso musicians who graduated from Tokyo University, who have mastered the art of creating music for today and for the future, through traditional Japanese instruments. The Hougaku Quartet carries out its mission through commission, revival performance of masterpieces composed after the 1960s, and performance in the traditional “Sankyoku” ensemble style. A group of young musicians who are committed to both sustaining and expanding tradition, Hougaku Quartet is a fresh approach to Japanese music. With a special guest performance by Ralph Samuelson.

Read More


Jan 31

WITLife #309: An Evening of Umami and Shokuiku

WIT Life is a periodic series written by professional Writer/Interpreter/Translator Stacy Smith (Kumamoto-ken CIR, 2000-03). She starts her day by watching Fujisankei’s newscast in Japanese, and here she shares some of the interesting tidbits and trends along with her own observations.

Last night I had the opportunity to interpret for Chef Kiyomi Mikuni at an event at Japan Society entitled “Umami and Other Japanese Culinary Secrets.” Mikuni is an entertaining speaker whose wide-ranging presentation covered everything from how important it is to develop taste buds at a young age to working with Japanese children on 食育 (shokuiku, or dietary education). Mikuni runs the gourmet French restaurant Hotel de Mikuni in Tokyo, but his culinary journey started in a fishing village in Hokkaido. Growing up he would go out with his fisherman father, and enjoy the fruits of the sea bestowed upon them. At 15 he went to Sapporo to work as a chef at a hotel there before moving to Tokyo’s Imperial Hotel. At 20 he was sent to Geneva to be the chef at the Japanese Embassy, where he Read More


Jan 26

Concert Recap: Yoshiki Classical Special at Carnegie Hall

By JQ magazine editor Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobe-shi, 2001-02). For more of his articles, click here.

On Jan. 12-13, Yoshiki of the band X Japan—the nation’s number one rock group, which has sold out the 55,000 seat Tokyo Dome a record 18 times and has moved more than 30 million singles and albums since forming in the 1980s—fulfilled a lifelong dream by debuting, and also selling out, two consecutive nights at Carnegie Hall in New York City with his Yoshiki Classical Special performance.

Backed by the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Yuga Cohler with arrangements by Shelly Berg, the nearly three-hour concert brought an arena vibe to the traditional concert hall setting. Featuring a mix of X Japan classics, new material, and pitch perfect renditions from the book of Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, Yoshiki brought the tunes to life at the piano, and additional turns from guest vocalists Katie Fitzgerald and Ashley Knight provided bright spots of witty banter (unlike other Japanese superstars poised for American fame, Yoshiki’s English is fluent).

The production team pushed the limits of imagination for Carnegie Hall, with lighting so intense that Yoshiki himself had to ask his crew mid-song to reposition of one of the rigs. Videos and still images (courtesy of last year’s internationally released documentary We Are X) were amply beamed overhead throughout the show, giving the audience the full scope of Yoshiki’s lifelong artistic journey.

In the final stretch following the X Japan epic “Art of Life,” an instrumental version of “Endless Rain” spotlighted a colossal mirror ball that bathed the hall in brilliant, swirling light, as those in the front rows unexpectedly belted out its bilingual chorus to the delight of longtime fans.

While X Japan supporters might have to wait a bit longer to witness another full band performance in New York (they last headlined Madison Square Garden in 2014), Yoshiki Classical Special easily lived up to its name, making another dream come true for both performer and audience.

For additional photos and videos of the concert, visit Yoshiki’s homepage at www.yoshiki.net.

01 - 20170112_KA2_0053 02 - KA4_0752 03 KA2_0197 04 KA4_0441 05 DSC_6307_r

Read More


Dec 20

JET Alumni: Positions Using Japanese at San Francisco Career Forum 2017 (San Francisco, CA, USA)

Posted by Sydney Sparrow, an ALT currently living in Toyota CityClick here to join the JETwit Jobs Google Group and receive job listings even sooner by email.


Event: JET Alumni: Positions Using Japanese at San Francisco Career Forum 2017
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA

Thanks to JET alumna Catherine Rackley (Chiba-ken)  who works for DISCO International, for sharing this info:

JET alumni with at least conversational Japanese language ability are invited to the San Francisco Career Forum 2017 on February 11 & 12.

In addition to being a great opportunity to meet and interview directly with companies seeking individuals with intercultural skills, the San Francisco Career Forum will feature an informative panel discussion with bilingual IT professionals from Google, Nikkei America, and more.

—– San Francisco Career Forum  2017 —–

February 11 & 12 (Sat. & Sun.)

San Francisco Marriott Marquis

http://www.careerforum.net/event/sf/?ref=2017JETwit&lang=E

Register and begin applying to companies here: http://www.careerforum.net/event/sf/comlist.asp?ref=2016JETwit&lang=E

*There is no cost to register for or attend Career Forums.

*No cancellation is required if you later become unable to attend.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact JET alum, Catherine Rackley, at c.rackley@discointer.com.

We hope to see you in San Francisco!

Sincerely,

Catherine Rackley (Chiba-ken, 2005-2006)

DISCO International, Inc.


Dec 16

WIT Life is a periodic series written by professional Writer/Interpreter/Translator Stacy Smith (Kumamoto-ken CIR, 2000-03). She starts her day by watching Fujisankei’s newscast in Japanese, and here she shares some of the interesting tidbits and trends along with her own observations.

Last night I attended a screening of Martin Scorsese’s new film Silence, based on the 1966 novel 沈黙 (Chinmoku) by Shusaku Endo, himself a Japanese Catholic.  It is the story of a Jesuit missionary sent to 17th century Japan, who is played with great nuance by Andrew Garfield.  He and his followers endure horrible persecution during this period when 隠れキリシタン (Kakure Kirishitan or Hidden Christians) are targeted for their beliefs.  Having lived in Kyushu I had a vague sense of what had taken place in Nagasaki at that time, but not the extent of the barbaric ways Christians were killed and tortured. Read More


Dec 4

2017 Sakura Matsuri: Looking for Committee Members

Posted by Sydney Sparrow, an ALT currently living in Toyota CityClick here to join the JETwit Jobs Google Group and receive job listings even sooner by email.


Position: Committee Members 
Posted by: Japan-America Society of Washington DC
Location: Washington, D.C., USA

Each spring during the cherry blossom season, Japan-America Society of Washington DC (JASWDC) produces the largest one-day Japanese street festival in America, and it is here in the Nation’s Capital!  This coming year the festival will be held on Saturday, April 8 from 10:30 to 6:00 pm in the Capitol Riverfront Neighborhood in SE DC (Navy Yard Metro Station).  Each year, it takes about 65 Sakura Matsuri Committee members and over 600 volunteers to put on this huge event.

The festival is not only the celebration of the gift of the cherry trees in 1912, but also JASWDC’s largest outreach program to educate Washingtonians about Japanese culture.  For the last three years, we have been able to impact over 100,000 people and show the richness of Japan and its culture.

The Sakura Matsuri Committee is divided up into 18 different sub-committees which are led by Chairs and Sub-chairs.  Each year, JASW is very lucky to have a strong core of committee members who come back year after year.  However, there are always a couple of spots we need to fill.  We understand that many of our Sakura Matsuri Committee members work, go to school or live in other cities, and may not be able to come to all the meetings.  In that case, each committee and its members should be in contact by e-mail or phone talking about committee responsibilities.

Our first meeting is on Friday, December 16 at JASWDC from 6:30.  The following meeting will be a team building meeting on Sunday, January 8 from 12:00 to 4:00 pm.  The team building meeting is designed for all the committees to meet and get to know each other.  We do exercises that help us prepare for the festival; more experienced committee members will discuss their experiences with Sakura Matsuri, and have a good time with people all working for the same goal, putting on the best Japanese street festival in the country.

On the day of the festival the Chairs and Sub-chairs are asked to arrive at 4:30 am to help unload the truck, and organize their committee supplies.  Sometimes, it feels like there is never enough time!

Meeting Schedule:

  1. Friday, December 16 at JASWDC from 6:30pm
  2. Sunday, January 8 from 12 – 4pm
  3. February Individual Meetings with Sub-Committees
  4. Friday, March2 at JASWDC from 6:30 pm
  5. On-site Meeting, TBD at Capitol Riverfront from 10am
  6. Volunteer Orientation at JASW; tentatively scheduled for March 19 thru March 31.
  7. Last Meeting, Wednesday, April 5 at JASWDC from 6:30pm
  8. Sakura Matsuri – Saturday, April 8 at Capitol Riverfront from 4:30am

Orientations for day-of volunteers will be at the end of March.  The Beer Garden’s orientation is mandatory for everyone!  For the Alcohol Committee orientations, a representative from DC’s ABRA comes out and lectures us on ID checking and JASWDC goes line by line for our management plan for the gardens.  We will offer 4 Beer Garden Orientations for volunteers to join.

If you are interested in being a part of the largest and best run Japanese street festival, please feel free to contact me directly at mhitzig@jaswdc.org, and I will let you know what positions on the Sakura Matsuri Committee are open.

Thank you very much and I hope to speak with you soon.

 
Sincerely,
Marc Hitzig
Niigata 92-95

Nov 21

Event: Great Lakes JETAA Job Fair (Michigan, USA)

Posted by Sydney Sparrow, an ALT currently living in Toyota CityClick here to join the JETwit Jobs Google Group and receive job listings even sooner by email.


Event: Great Lakes JETAA Job Fair
Location: Novi, Michigan, USA
Contract: Full-time

If you’ll be in Michigan or plan on moving to Michigan, the Great Lakes JETAA chapter is hosting its first job fair.

It will take place on Saturday, January 14th, 2017 at the Novi Civic Center, 45175 W 10 Mile Road, Novi, Michigan, 48375.

Please RSVP to the GLJETAA president, Adam Wolf at gljetaaprez@gmail.com by December 23rd if you plan on attending. 


Nov 18

WIT Life is a periodic series written by professional Writer/Interpreter/Translator Stacy Smith (Kumamoto-ken CIR, 2000-03). She starts her day by watching Fujisankei’s newscast in Japanese, and here she shares some of the interesting tidbits and trends along with her own observations.

Along with ramen and sushi, sake is a part of Japanese food and drink culture that is ubiquitous here in New York.  But as someone who spent the majority of my time in Japan in Kyushu, I sometimes wonder why shochu doesn’t get its fair share of the acclaim.  Down there shochu is the go-to drink, and since 90% of domestic production takes place at distilleries in Kyushu it is known as Shochu Island.

So I was thrilled when Japan Society asked me to interpret at its first ever event showcasing shochu, Distilled, Not Brewed: Discovering Shochu.  The main speaker was Shinichiro Watanabe, CEO of Kyoya Shuzo and Chairman of the Committee on Shochu Planning at the Japan Sake and Shochu Makers Association.  His presentation on shochu was for the uninitiated, and highlighted aspects of this distilled liquor such as its history, cultural significance and health benefits.

To breakdown the basics of Watanabe’s presentation, the main way that shochu differs from sake is that it is distilled as opposed to brewed.  Sake is made from rice whereas shochu can be made from ingredients such as sweet potato, barley and rice.  The ingredient is determined by what Read More


Page Rank